Guide Crash Course in Library Services to People with Disabilities

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Instead, program planning is a spectrum.


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  4. Crash Course in Library Services to People with Disabilities by Ann Roberts.
  5. Background Information.
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Some patrons may be interested in programs specifically targeting patrons with disabilities, such as early intervention play groups, Sensory Storytimes, Next Chapter Book Clubs, sensory-friendly library hour, life skills programs, parent workshops, therapy dog programs, peer buddy programs, and sensory-friendly films. Other patrons may prefer programs that welcome patrons of all abilities—such programs often utilize universal design principles in their approach.

Examples include some types of family programs, open play groups, accessible makerspace programming, drop-in gaming, social groups, Lego building clubs, and summer reading programs. Assistive technologies are excellent investments for libraries looking to expand the accessibility of media. Accessible operating systems and web browsers, screen readers, magnifying machines, and touch-screen devices can be excellent tools to support library use.

For more information about discounts available to Illinois libraries purchasing assistive technology, check out The Chicago Lighthouse at chicagolighthouse. Library collections should be accessible to those with different reading and learning styles.

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Provide access to all format types, including audio and e-audio, large print, touch-and-feel books, and big books. Hi-lo books, developed by publishers such as High Noon Books and Saddleback Educational Publishing, are high-interest titles written at low reading levels for those with reading disabilities. Consider launching a new collection of adaptive books, such as the adaptive books available through Illinois Leap into Literacy Program adaptivebooks. Circulate non-traditional collections promoting hands-on learning, such as early literacy kits, sensory kits, STEM and STEAM learning kits, and adaptive toy collections.


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  • For information about Braille service, talking book players, and other materials available to those with physical or visual disabilities, check out the Illinois Talking Book Outreach Center at illinoistalkingbooks. Librarians excel at many things, but marketing is not always one of them. How do we market to non-users?

    ALA Groups Working on Accessibility Issues

    People with disabilities may be uncomfortable or anxious about visiting a public space. Inclusive marketing strategies can help change the perception of the library to a more positive and welcoming one. Visit places that are frequented by everyone, regardless of ability. Hi-lo books, developed by publishers such as High Noon Books and Saddleback Educational Publishing, are high-interest titles written at low reading levels for those with reading disabilities.

    Consider launching a new collection of adaptive books, such as the adaptive books available through Illinois Leap into Literacy Program adaptivebooks. Circulate non-traditional collections promoting hands-on learning, such as early literacy kits, sensory kits, STEM and STEAM learning kits, and adaptive toy collections. For information about Braille service, talking book players, and other materials available to those with physical or visual disabilities, check out the Illinois Talking Book Outreach Center at illinoistalkingbooks.

    LIS 600 Library Services for Individuals with Disabilities

    Librarians excel at many things, but marketing is not always one of them. How do we market to non-users? People with disabilities may be uncomfortable or anxious about visiting a public space. Inclusive marketing strategies can help change the perception of the library to a more positive and welcoming one. Visit places that are frequented by everyone, regardless of ability. Post flyers at bus stops, train stations, park districts, community centers, or your local coffee shop.

    Lastly, consider utilizing paid advertisements on social media to target certain areas of the online community. Illinois libraries have led the way in developing innovative and inclusive programs for patrons with disabilities. To find out information about any of these programs, contact the host library to learn more. Stay informed Sign up for the free ILA email newsletter. ILA on Twitter.

    e-book Crash Course in Library Services to People with Disabilities

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    Designed and built in Chicago by Spinutech. If you know of a great resource that should be included in the Libraries and Accessibility pages, please contact Maria Bernier, Maria. Bernier ct. What is a disability? Users who successfully complete all of the training modules and quizzes can obtain a Certificate of Achievement.

    Crash Course in Library Services to Preschool Children : Betsy Diamant-Cohen :

    This one is worth printing and sharing with all your staff. Learn how to speak about people with disabilities using language from this People First chart. Serving Library Users on the Autism Spectrum is an online course designed by experts in both the library and autism fields.

    It consists of a series of four independent, self-paced instructional modules that are intended for librarians and library staff to learn how to better serve their users with autism spectrum disorder ASD. For training on interacting with patrons who have intellectual or developmental disabilities, try BnB Global Services.

    Webjunction archived an October webinar called " Serving the Underserved: Children with Disabilities at Your Library " which you can view with a free Webjunction account. The associated web page includes a long, incredibly practical resource list.